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On Wikipedia and "The Truth"

wikipedia logo I’ve been thinking a lot lately about Truth. The impetus was John Siracusa’s two podcasts about Wikipedia, in which he argues that Wikipedia is fundamentally flawed, and that its flaw prevents it from being as good a source of knowledge as it might otherwise be. The crux is Wikipedia’s insistence on verifiability for facts that it includes (not that this rule is rigorously enforced) over what Siracusa calls “the truth.”

These two podcasts are about the closest I’ve ever heard a “normal” discussion come to facing the fundamental questions of epistemology. In the second of the two episodes, Siracusa addresses complaints from the first episode, who repeatedly use the word “verify.” Siracusa’s understood this word from Wikipedia’s perspective, where it often means “to cite another authority.”

I think that the folks writing to Siracusa meant “verify” to mean simply “confirm.” Fundamentally, that’s the problem with first-person accounts—they’re unconfirmed. But, you might say, can’t two first-person accounts confirm each other? Siracusa suggests a system of persistent identities and a system like Stack Overflow’s reputation system. I’m not sure, but I believe that system works because the scope of the site is fairly limited. What if someone on a Wikipedia-like site of knowledge has a high “reputation” earned by writing about software, and suddenly edits an article about politics? And if first-person accounts are allowed, wouldn’t most of the site tend toward being first person accounts (since Siracusa’s whole reason for talking about this is that he wants first-person accounts to be left in)?

Let’s look at an example. I was just looking at the Wikipedia page for John Gruber. It cites an interview with Gruber, along with other sources, for facts that are general common knowledge. They’re common knowledge because Gruber’s website is widely read, and those facts have appeared there. Why not just cite the blog directly?

This gets exactly to the heart of what “truth” means. Siracusa kept saying “Wikipedia is not trying to get to the truth!” But I think that’s putting it too strongly. Wikipedia is after something like “the consensus of human knowledge,” which is a reasonable definition of “truth,” I think. Sirucasa is after the actual, out-there-in-the-universe version of truth. But the problem is that that truth is unknowable. Until Galileo discovered that the Earth is not the center of the universe, there was no way to know the truth about it. What’s more, even after he made the discovery, the truth was knowable only if you believed him. If you found his arguments persuasive. Two kinds of people would have found Galileo’s arguments persuasive: those who had an understanding of science enough to see why he was right, and those who are just inclined to believe bizarre or unusual things they hear: people with a low threshold for truth. The fact that people who understood the science and knew that Galileo was correct had a vested intrest in not saying so doesn’t change the fact that the only way for a member of the general public to come to believe Galileo was for the experts to come around and admit that he’d been right all along.

And so it is with all non-trivial truth: we rely on authoritative sources to tell us which sources to believe. Is global climate change real? The consensus of climatologists is that it is. Does government stimulus policy decrease the effects of recession? The consensus of economists deems it so. Are ruffles the new black? A consensus of fashionistas says yes. “The consensus of human knowledge” is by definition the closest we can get to “the truth” in areas of human knowledge where we’re not experts.

An objection to this is that any person has the theoretical potential to become an expert in any topic. If something is controversial, couldn’t Wikipedia include both sides of the controversy along with the arguments for each? Two reasons to think this might not be a good idea. First, the reason Wikipedia exists seems to me to be to provide general information for non-experts. We can expect Wikipedia to provide you with the basics of the science of climate change, for example. Seems a bit much to expect it to be able to turn you into an expert on the subject. Second, if Wikipedia contains not just what can be cited (“verified,” “confirmed”) but anything and everything that is true (read: anything and everything that might be true), its entries will have no check on their growth. For example, the article on 4chan has over 5000 words and 136 citations. How long would this article be if un-cited facts were allowed? Who’d want to read more than 5000 words about 4chan, and should the level of sort knowledge they’re after be collected, for all possible topics, in one place on the internet. Maybe.

I’m hinting at how it is I think the rules of Wikipedia might have come to be what they are. I think intelligent people got together and spent a lot of time thinking, discussing, and experimenting with these rules, and Wikipedia is the consensus on which they arrived as the best vehicle for arriving at The Truth. It’s, as Sirucasa said, the worst way for arriving at the truth except for all the others. Maybe. I think so, anyway.

Posted: Thursday February 9, 2012 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment [2]

 

I don’t think I’m not going to make a whole big post about this every week going forward, but of course the new episode of On The Fence is out today. Go listen!

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On the Fence episode 12: A Warm and Pleasant Dinner

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On The Fence Episode 12: A Warm and Pleasant Dinner, in which we suffer through some of the worst audio tribulations yet to talk about the Republican race and the State of the Union. On the plus side, it’s only 45 minutes.

You can subscribe in iTunes here. And please drop us a rating while you’re there.

Posted: Thursday January 26, 2012 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment

 

On the Fence episode 11: Goat Brains

On The Fence episode 6

On The Fence Episode 11: Goat Brains, in which we talk about Facebook, timeline, Google Plus, and Andrew Sullivan’s Newsweek article about Barack Obama’s performance in office and legacy.

If you haven’t already, you should subscribe in iTunes here. And give us a rating.

Posted: Wednesday January 18, 2012 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment

 

On the Fence episode 10: 22.8 percent

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On The Fence Episode 10: 22.8 percent, in which we talk about the New Hampshire primary, Ron Paul, $7.77 trillion, and whether prison inmates should have the right to masturbate.

If you haven’t already, you should subscribe in iTunes here. And give us a rating.

Posted: Wednesday January 11, 2012 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment

 

I was slow to post it, but I got a response to my email to Oxford Press and Handmark regarding the Oxford American Dictionary app almost right away.

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On the Fence episode 9: My Pants They're Tight

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On The Fence Episode 9: My Pants They’re Tight, in which we talk about many things, but mainly the Miami Art Museum renaming, pertaining to which Steve just sent me a link to this NYTimes article, of which the most important bit is the ending:

Though it’s not uncommon for a smaller art museum to take on the identity of a major benefactor, it is less common with larger institutions, said Maxwell L. Anderson, who in January will become director of the Dallas Museum of Art. “No one has ever seen this happen at a museum that aspires to be a major metropolitan museum,” he said.

Mary E. Frank, a former president of the Miami museum, not only resigned from the board in protest but also took out a full-page newspaper advertisement with her husband, Howard, the chief operating officer of Carnival Corporation. She said the ad’s opposition to the name change had drawn nearly 300 e-mails of support and that she and her husband would not fulfill the remaining half of a $500,000 pledge they had made.

Mr. Rodríguez, another trustee who resigned, said his company, Carnival Cruise Lines, is now debating whether to come through on the balance of a $5 million endowment gift, of which $1.5 million had already been awarded.

“We feel we made a pledge to the Miami Art Museum,” he said. “Not to the Jorge Pérez Museum.”

But Craig Robins, a member of the board who is a developer and prominent collector, suggested that those opposed to the renaming should collectively match Mr. Pérez’s contribution and try to retain the name. “It’s not fair to be critical unless you’re willing to do something about it,” he said.

He said he was sure Mr. Pérez “would gladly relinquish it,” adding: “He’s being the generous one. He’s the only one stepping up to the plate.”

As per always, you should subscribe in iTunes here. And while you’re there, why not throw the show a rating or write a review?

Posted: Wednesday December 7, 2011 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment [1]

 

On the Fence episode 8: Lectures on Ethics

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Posted yesterday and linked today: episode 8 of On the Fence, wherein Steve and I talk about how congress seems to be going out of its mind (the police state bill passed the senate as we were recording), Newt Gingrich’s lasting legacy, and Moral Relativism.

As per always, you should subscribe in iTunes here. And while you’re there, why not throw the show a rating or write a review?

Posted: Thursday December 1, 2011 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment

 

On the Fence episode 7: Edgewater

On The Fence episode 6

Also just posted: episode 7 of On The Fence, my podcast with Steve. This week: Thanksgiving special! After sorting out a couple of Steve’s myriad computer issues, he and Alesh talk about what they’re grateful for, Edgewater, transvestites, the budget super committee, and Grover Norquist.

As per always, you should subscribe in iTunes here.

Posted: Wednesday November 23, 2011 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment

 

On the Fence episode 6: 100-point Pesto

On The Fence episode 6

Also just posted: episode 6 of On The Fence, my podcast with Steve. This week, we continue our conversation from last week about whether foodies are terrible people, and touch on whether the budget supercommittee has a prayer of getting anything useful done.

As per always, you should subscribe in iTunes here.

Posted: Wednesday November 16, 2011 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment

 

On The Fence episode 5: Greece, Michael Jackson's doctor, and foodies

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In Episode 5 of On The Fence, Steve and I talk about Greece, the Eurozone, Goldman Sachs, what the conviction of Michael Jackson’s doctor says about our medical system, and why foodies are terrible, terrible people. Anniversary episode!

If you haven’t already, you should subscribe in iTunes here.

Posted: Wednesday November 9, 2011 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment

 

On The Fence episode 4

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In Episode 4 of On The Fence, we talk about the past, present, and future of the Occupy movement and the Move Your Money Project with local artist and Occupy Miami activist Misael Soto. You should follow him on Tumblr and on Twitter.

Posted: Friday November 4, 2011 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment

 

Gruber's wrong about Apple TV

On Wednesday I posted my article predicting how the future Apple TV will work, and I emailed a link to John Gruber of Daring Fireball, who’s been writing a lot about this stuff (here and here). No problem there, the guy’s busy, super-selective about linking stuff, and probably finds my ideas to be pretty obvious.

But then I listen to him on yesterday’s Talk Show, and holy crap. Gruber believes:

This is insane. Predicting what Apple will do based on what it’s done in the past is a great strategy, except when it’s not. My take-away from what Apple’s done over the last 5 years is that they’ve systematically become more and more realistic about what people need in a product to buy it, and putting that into the product. The obstacles that’ve kept people from getting an iPhone have been systematically eliminated (enterprise support, pricing, more carriers). So why the heck would they create an television that doesn’t work with cable?

Certainly there are people who get by without cable (I’m one), and the numbers are growing every year. But even more people can’t imagine life without cable. (I imagine Gruber is one, sports fanatic that he is.) Is your Apple TV going to connect to a cable box? I think Steve Jobs’ quote, “the simplest user interface you could imagine,” takes that off the table. So I’m sticking by my predictions there: the Apple TV will work equally well with or without cable. For those using it with cable, it’ll abstract away as much of the vestiges of cable — channels, schedules, etc. — as it can.

But the “apps as channels” thing is even crazier thing to me, for reasons that I don’t even think require explanation. Look at the mess that magazine apps have made of navigation. Do you really want every channel on your TV to have its own navigation?!

I usually agree with Gruber, but here I think he’s just as wrong as Marco was. John Siracusa will presumably discuss this today. I think he’ll be able to talk some sense to these people.

Posted: Friday October 28, 2011 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment [1]

 

On The Fence episode 3

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In Episode 3 of On The Fence, we talk about Gaddafi’s death and the future of the world, North Korea, the present of Occupy Wall Street, and Steve Jobs. You should really subscribe in iTunes so I don’t have to keep posting these links.

Posted: Thursday October 27, 2011 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment

 

On The Fence episode 2: Occupy Wall Street

On The Fence episode 2

Here’s episode 2 of the On the Fence podcast. Steve and I talk about Occupy Wall Street, and whether there’s any chance at all of Herman Cain becoming president. But here’s the thing: you can now subscribe in iTunes.

Posted: Thursday October 20, 2011 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment

 

On The Fence episode 1

Here’s episode 1 of On The Fence, a hopefully weekly podcast by me and Steve of Obalesque. The not insignificant audio issues are all my fault, and will be reduced in coming episodes, I sure hope. An iTunes listing is pending.

Posted: Friday September 30, 2011 by Alesh Houdek · Permalink · Comment

 

Google has added recipe search. Should food fans rejoice? Not so fast.

Other biases – these having to do with Google’s idea of what people should be cooking and eating – are also at work. In setting up parameters for refining results based on cooking time and calories, Google explicitly, if subtly, gives privilege to low-calorie recipes that can be cooked quickly, as shown in the options it allows for refining a recipe search:

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